18 July 2007

Asking For Trouble With This Hair Business: An SPF Review

Now that I've actually seen it, I can recommend Cipher on more than the merits of Kip Fagan and his lovely (although, I think, shorter now) hair. This is a beautiful, strange, interesting, engaging, sweet, mysterious play, and especially for ten bucks, you shouldn't miss it.

The play, by Cory Hinkle, treads familiar dystopian near-future territory, but that's no more reason to complain than when some other playwright treads familiar troubled-family-in-a-livingroom territory, and maybe even less. This is a specific and well-imagined world, and I enjoyed discovering it bit by bit. (I wonder how the first twenty minutes played for anyone who hadn't read the SPF blurb - probably less clearly, but possibly even more interestingly.) The language of this play, both in words and physical vocabulary, is wonderfully specific and well-crafted. (I need synonyms for "specific" here.) Special credit in creating the world is due to Leah Gelpe's sound design, which was rich and creepy and awesome. Most of the acting was pretty close to stellar - Adam Driver, whom I've seen do perfectly good work in readings and workshoppy things, gave a riveting performance, full of sadness and longing and all sorts of other incredibly good things. Mandy Sigfried, whom I'd never seen before, was also fantastic. She also plays a mean xylophone. (Creepy and beautiful memory songs by Jared Hinkle.)

That's a lot of adjectives up there. I'm trying to avoid plot points because so much of the pleasure of this show is the way it slowly opens itself up. So let's summarize - Cipher, at SPF, playing through Sunday:

lovely, beautiful, strange, interesting, engaging, sweet, mysterious, familiar, dystopian, specific, well-imagined, well-crafted, rich, creepy, awesome, pretty close to stellar, riveting, good, fantastic, mean.


This is by no means a perfect play nor a perfect production, but I still think you should see it. And maybe don't read the blurb first, and see how that goes.

6 comments:

Freeman said...

I thought reviewing an SPF show was strictly a no-no.

Jaime said...

Okay, so let's not call it a review. Let's call it me blogging about a show that I saw.

Brikin Blog said...

Even if it's a no-no, I'm so glad you wrote about it. I could not agree with you more about the show or about Kip's lustrous hair. Love, Kip's wife.

Jaime said...

Ha! Thank you, Kip's wife. I knew I was asking for trouble, but this is probably the least troublesome way it could have played out.

The internet is so weird.

Freeman said...

Oh, I realize that sounded snarky, when it was me trying to be a card. Man, I fail at the internet.

Term Papers said...

The language of this play, both in words and physical vocabulary, is wonderfully specific and well-crafted. Special credit in creating the world is due to Leah Gelpe's sound design, which was rich and creepy and awesome and these are many Appreciating words.

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